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beheading

One of the men is made to make a full confession, explaining his ‘crimes’ to the camera, before they pair are beheaded and their bodies shown to the camera.

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Nine signs of low testosterone men should not ignore

Queens Gazette

The male hormone testosterone is a potent chemical messenger directly influencing an array of physiological processes. From functioning as the regulator of a healthy sex drive in men to maintaining the male physique to increasing a man’s competitive nature, testosterone has far-reaching and powerful effects on a man’s body and mind.

A normal range for testosterone is between 280 to 1,100 nanograms per deciliter (ng/dl). However, low testosterone in men is considered to be below 300 ng/dl. When a man has a low level of testosterone, it may be referred to as low testosterone, low T, hypogonadism and/or testosterone deficiency.

Would a man necessarily know if he his testosterone levels are low? And if they are, why does it matter? Men with low T may have several bells and whistles trying to get his attention that low T is his problem. From his sex life suffering to having certain health parameters out of range such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol, these can be signals something within is not right and is affecting his health and well-being.

Men who suspect that low testosterone might be the trigger for certain symptoms he is experiencing, need to be familiar with signs of low T. Ignoring these signs or symptoms is not advised.

It is important for a man to discuss these symptoms with his doctor and to get his testosterone levels checked. If it is low T, it can be replaced to make up for what his body is no longer producing enough of. Just like blood pressure or thyroid levels are treated to help bring back to a normal state, low T needs the same attention. Not addressing a testosterone decline can subject men to an increased risk for bone fractures, diabetes, and heart disease, as well as cognitive declines, loss of sexual performance, and overall lack of motivation.

Here are 9 signs indicating a man might have low T that all men should be aware of:

Low libido

One of the most significant and first signs of low T is a reduced interest in sex. Some men may chalk it up to getting older, as it can be common for sex drive to decline with age. But men with low T will usually have a noticeable drop in their desire for sex.

Erectile dysfunction

Testosterone is the driver turning on the engine for sexual desire, but it also is responsible for helping a man achieve and maintain an erection. Testosterone works together with nitric oxide, a molecule triggering a series of chemical reactions that is necessary for an erection to occur. If testosterone levels plummet, a man will have difficulty in achieving an erection sufficient for sexual intercourse.

Fatigue

A drop in testosterone can zap a man’s energy levels. Men who used to have loads of energy throughout the day, who now require an afternoon nap just to make it to dinnertime, could be experiencing low T.

Depression and mood changes

When testosterone levels drop, this can result in a drop in a man’s emotional well-being and an increased likelihood of depression and moodiness. For many men, these types of emotional shifts can be some of the first indications of low T. Research has shown that up to 56% of men with low T will also have significant symptoms of depression.

Decreased bone mass

Even though the brittle bone disease of osteoporosis is mainly associated with women, men with low T can also experience thinning bones. Testosterone helps produce and strengthen bone and when levels are below normal this means a man may have lower bone volume making them more susceptible to bone fractures.

Loss of muscle mass

What helps play a role in giving men their muscular physique is the hormone testosterone. If a man is noticing his muscle mass is less than usual, he might be able to blame it on low T. Studies have shown testosterone affects muscle mass, but not necessarily strength or function.

Breast growth and increased body fat

Low testosterone levels in men can sometimes lead to increased body fat and a condition called gynecomastia, or the development of larger breasts. The male body produces both testosterone and estrogen, although estrogen is usually found at low levels. But if a man’s testosterone levels are especially low in comparison to estrogen, or if there is an excess of estrogen relative to testosterone, larger breast may develop along with more body fat leading to extra weight gain.

Changes in sleep patterns

In some men, low testosterone can cause insomnia or other sleep disturbances.

Trouble concentrating

Many men with low T complain of “brain fog” or find themselves getting off track easily due to trouble concentrating. Memory loss is another common complaint of men with low T that has started to affect their daily life.

In conclusion

Any man experiencing any of the symptoms of low T needs to contact his primary care physician as soon as possible. By getting tested and then treated for low T, this can help a man avoid many of the health issues associated with this common condition and to have better management over his health and well-being.

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Feminism is dangerous because it erodes functional hierarchical structures of society. Let feminism have its ways, and you end up with all and everything being a mess.

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India's female genital mutilation: a thousand-year-old secret

So little was known, until recently, about the secretive practice of FGM in a small Muslim community that India is not even on the UN’s list of FGM countries.

India’s Dawoodi Bohra community has been so closeted about its practice of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) that its recent disclosure shocked even women’s rights activists. It was the highly publicised criminal trial of the FGM of two Bohra girls in Australia, in 2010 and 2011, which shattered the secrecy around this practice. Following investigation and trial, the mother of the girls, the midwife and a Bohra priest in Australia were sentenced to 15 months in prison in 2016.

They are a Shia Muslim sect that migrated to India from Yemen in the 12th century. Their custom of FGM probably originated in Yemen as it’s still a widespread practice there. The Bohra population is only about one million in size, with most settled in western India, and smaller communities in other countries.

Perhaps what shocks most is that this practice is being carried out among the Bohras who are regarded as a progressive, prosperous and well educated community. In fact, the Bohras are proud that their daughters are encouraged to excel in their education and jobs in much the same way as their sons. Most Bohra women are not veiled and choose modern, western attire and lifestyles. Even the burkha of Bohra women, called the Rida, is designed to reflect the community’s view of itself as being innovative and progressive. The Rida leaves the face uncovered, with a flap as option, and instead of the conservative black, it is always in bright colours like deep pinks, reds and greens, with lace and designs.

Nonetheless, recent testimonies and initiatives by Bohra women indicate that FGM is practiced widely. In 2015 a group of women launched ‘Sahiyo’ meaning ‘female friend,’ an online platform that aims to create a safe, women-supported space for Bohra FGM survivors to share their personal stories and to lobby support via a petition for a law to ban FGM in India. As there is no law in India banning FGM, a survey by Sahiyo indicates that the ratio of Bohra girls who have been subjected to FGM could be as high as 80 per cent. The survey also includes Bohra women in the US, UK and Australia. After India, the second highest proportion of women in the survey, 31 percent, are in the US.

The Bohras practice Type-I FGM which involves the partial or complete removal of the clitoris or clitoral hood. The clitoris is referred to as the ‘Haram ki boti’ or ‘sinful piece of flesh’ a recognition of its biological role in women’s orgasms and libido. Even though FGM is called ‘Khatna’ or ‘circumcision,’ which is a ‘coming of age’ social ritual and fervently discussed and debated among women in other communities, what makes it odd among the Bohras is that it appears to be an extremely clandestine procedure. Aarefa Johari, one of the co-founders of Sahiyo says it is never talked about even among girls and women. Testimonies from Bohra women, discussed in agonising details, show the procedure is carried out by impoverished women practitioners, (who probably just need the income) in unhygienic environments, using a razor blade without anaesthesia.

FGM should be relatively easy to eradicate in India. Clearly many Bohra women want this custom abolished. Public testimonies of survivors show extreme angst. Many women have admitted that this has affected their sex lives adversely. Others speak of a much deeper psychological scarring caused by this childhood trauma. As one woman says, ‘The pain was blinding and ravaging… At 33, I feel sick and mentally disturbed because still I remember that day… I can only believe that most of our women feel like me. But consider themselves weak to change. But I ask still, Why? How can we put our children through this horror of FGM?’ Oddly, even though many Bohra women are extremely uncomfortable about the practice and want it to stop, there’s no clear answer as to why or how it continues.

‘People fear ostracism in the community,’ explains Aarefa Johari. She says families who don’t do FGM stay silent about their choice. Dilshad Tavawala, a child protection lawyer in Canada, who believes FGM is a violation of child rights, also speaks about how ‘the backlash [of ostracisation] is considerable and many just won’t do business with you.’

While ostracisation is a powerful tool of control in small, homogenous, rural communities, it is generally non-effective for the urban, middle and upper income, educated strata because the environment offers alternatives. However, what makes the Bohras an exception, is that the community’s structure and function is akin to that of a cult.

The community is tightly controlled by the religious head, the Syedna. Every individual, from birth, is issued a Bohra identity card without which they are not even allowed to enter their mosques. Bohras are required to take an oath of allegiance (misaq) to the Syedna, and must obtain his permission not just for religious issues, but for all personal, familial and professional decisions. Furthermore, they have to pay a compulsory tax to the Syedna for every activity – including birth, death, marriage, business and education. They must acknowledge him as the ‘Jan-O-Mal ka Malik’ (The Lord and Master of Their Life and Properties) and have the inscription `Abde-Syedna' or ‘Slave of the Syedna’ on their wedding cards. The Syedna also asserts himself as the sole trustee of all the mosques and associated properties, trusts and monetary contributions. As Asghar Ali Engineer (1939-2013), one of the fiercest spokesperson of the Bohra reformist movement had said, ‘You can’t literally breathe without their permission.’ The punishments for noncompliance are severe and include not being allowed to pray in the mosque, bury a parent, being forcefully divorced, being forcefully disowned by families, physical harm, and sabotage of businesses and careers. In 1978, the Citizens for Democracy appointed the Nathwani Commission to investigate charges of tyranny against the Syedna. In its 220-page report, the Commission recounted testimonies of victims and said it had found ‘large-scale infringement of civil liberties and human rights.’ Strangely, most Indian media did not report on this. The India Today magazine did but found that witnesses, who had agreed to speak to them, suddenly withdrew. After receiving threats, the magazine was forced to conceal the reporter’s name.

Successive Prime Ministers from Indira Gandhi to Narendra Modi have pandered to the immensely wealthy Syedna, conferring political clout on his totalitarian control on the Bohra community. The Syedna has encouraged the Bohras to embrace Modi despite widespread aversion to his role as chief minister in the 2002 carnage of Muslims in Gujarat for which he has been rewarded by Modi with a Padma Shri, one of India’s highest civilian awards.

In a 2016 public sermon in Bombay, the Syedna instructed the community to continue with FGM. He was responding to the FGM trials and arrests in Australia that year. The Australian authorities had arrested a senior Borah cleric for attempting to thwart investigations and for directing ‘members of the community [in Australia] to give false accounts to the police.’ Fearing a similar crackdown, the Bohra clergy in the US, UK and Europe told their communities to comply with the laws of the land. This was probably just lip-service for it is understood that the Syedna, whose seat is in Bombay, is the ultimate authority for Bohras the world over. In his public sermon the Syedna emphasised that ‘the act has to happen…Stay firm…Even [for] the big sovereign states…we are not prepared to understand.’

It is critical for India to have an anti-FGM law and to enforce its implementation, especially as India’s medical community has failed to address the ethics of FGM and is inclined to exploit it. The danger here is the medical legitimisation of FGM as Shaheeda Kirtane, co-founder of Sahiyo, points out.

A public petition to the Indian government by the advocacy group Speak Out on FGM to outlaw FGM in India has garnered more than 80,000 signatures. The groups founder Masooma Ranalvi, a Bohra FGM survivor, who has also been pushing for the UN to recognize FGM in India, has launched a second petition to the UN . Inclusion in UNFPA and UNICEF’s Joint Programme on the eradication of FGM would give Bohra activists the much needed global support to nudge the Indian government into action.

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For the current legal systems in the Western World, and for the mainstream media anyway, doing physical harm to men, or killing them, is peanuts. A woman who kills her sexual partner always gets full sympathy. Never mind what kind of bitch she is.

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It is the secret dream of every Swedish or German woman to marry a black men, or at least have sex with a black man. Every smart young African man should migrate to Europe. Free money, nice house, good sex!

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ME BEFORE YOU: AN INFOMERCIAL FOR ASSISTED SUICIDE

Dodge this romantic drama with a depressing pay-off.

SPIKED

Why do we celebrate (and in some places, actively assist) what can only rationally be regarded as a self-centred and cowardly decision to destroy oneself?

The film Me Before You, released last Friday, would have been a fairly standard romantic weepie, except for — SPOILER ALERT — its inclusion of suicide. Will Traynor, a ridiculously rich, successful and stupidly handsome fellow, has an accident that renders him quadriplegic. His mother hires a companion — an annoyingly ditzy, wacky with a capital W, working-class girl, for whom Will would ordinarily be strictly out of bounds — who manages to cheer Will up and, lo, they fall in love. Then Will kills himself. At a Dignitas clinic. Because apparently he is a determined guy. He leaves her some money.

At one level, of course, the film is artistic expression (I use the word artistic loosely), absolutely free to say whatever it wants. Yet the film is not only bad art; it’s also propaganda for the so-called right to die. The author of the novel on which the film is based (and the script), Jo Jo Moyes, continues to protest that it is only about an individual, and that it is not ‘by any means’ sending out a message. But, in the same breath, she insists that ‘unless you put yourself in somebody’s shoes, I think you shouldn’t judge their action’, and says this is about ‘autonomy and choice’.

The sophomoric presentation of the issue at the heart of the film might have been lifted from a GCSE Ethics and Philosophy textbook on the case for the right to die. The family is upset about Will’s decision. Mother tearfully resists and tells him to wait; father is grimly resigned because it’s Will’s decision and he must be able to make it. Girlfriend tearfully upset but finally accepting. All accept his decision and are at Will’s deathbed at Dignitas’s beautiful Swiss chalet (in reality, it is a grim house in a Swiss industrial park).

The protests by disabled people outside cinemas showing Me Before You are completely understandable. Will’s rejection of his life, his refusal to live hampered by disability, is a direct insult to those who do so every day. The film presents Will as determined and courageous, belying the fact that disabled people struggle and suffer with lives beset by disabilities, choosing to live. Which is more courageous — to die, to be defeated by one’s disabilities, to bail out; or to continue suffering and battling past whatever barriers are put in the way, to continue to live?

No one seems to know any more. This is why this same plotline features in so many TV and filmic dramas. Real suicides are usually tragic, often sordid and always awful. But suicide as a plot device allows the author to weigh the value of continued existence against the ends that the character killing him or herself seeks.

What is weighed up in these modern dramas about assisted suicide? On one scale, Will’s life is mere existence, increasingly meaningless, adrift, dependent on others, helpless, pointless, isolated, and devoid of any pleasure. On the other scale are the last vestiges of his social existence, his being as a son, lover, and friend. Me Before You is the opposite of life-affirming; it reassures the audience that giving up is okay. It’s the equivalent of George Bailey jumping into the icy waters and everyone standing around saying ‘Yeah, nice one, mate’, somewhat changing the end of It’s a Wonderful Life.

Such a view perverts the relationship between the individual and his community and indicates the erosion of a general moral sense of right and wrong. Paradoxically, suicide must be an option if a community is to be made up of free individuals, but the community has an interest in preventing the purposeful destruction of any of its members, no matter that the killer and victim are one and the same. Contra Moyes’ sentiments, we must judge whether the taking of a life is understandable in the circumstances, whether it is praiseworthy or blameworthy. But it is a good general rule that killing — even oneself — is wrong.

These dramas highlight the fact that no one seems sure that human existence is worth it. Few seem confident enough to assert moral rules; there is no more right and wrong, only ‘right for you’ and ‘right for me’.

In the end, films like this tap into the anxiety and uncertainty that many feel about the future. What if I was paralysed? Would I want to die? Moyes mentioned that she was inspired to write the book after hearing about the case of Daniel James, the paralysed rugby player who killed himself at Dignitas a few years ago.

More inspiring but less well-known is the example of Matt Hampson, who was paralysed from the neck down 11 years ago. He told his father that the injury would make him a better person. Matt didn’t believe that himself at first, but said last year that he is beginning to believe it after launching the Matt Hampson Foundation, which helps people with life-altering injuries.

Instead of paying money to see a mediocre infomercial for the right to die, why not donate that money to the Matt Hampson Foundation instead?

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Of course, female sexuality is a merchandise. That's the nature of human reality. And it's the essence of culture. Because the alternative would be that men appropriate female sexuality by violence. And that's less pretty.

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American School in Japan told pedophile teacher abused girls for decades, Portland firm says

The Oregon Live

Portland attorneys representing 10 women who say they were sexually abused by a notorious pedophile teacher at the American School in Japan in the 1970s and '80s sent a demand letter Thursday to the prestigious Tokyo school, claiming the school ignored reports that the teacher was preying on girls for decades.

The letter claims the American School allowed teacher Jack Moyer to have unfettered access to his victims, middle-school girls, including one who now lives in central Oregon. For more than a century, the school has been attended by the children of leaders of U.S. businesses including Nike and Boeing, government officials and missionaries working in Japan.

The school couldn’t immediately be reached for comment for this story.

The Portland firm of O’Donnell Clark and Crew sent the letter. Attorney Steve Crew said the first victim he’s been able to identify told school administration in 1975 that Moyer had abused her.

“She reported it to the headmaster, and nothing happened,” Crew said. “And that was the pattern for 25 years.”

Crew said many of the 10 victims or their families reported Moyer’s alleged sexual abuse to the school, but he was allowed to continue working with children.

Moyer worked for the school from 1963 to 2000, according to the firm, and retired in 2000. He killed himself in 2004.

That was a short while after two of the 10 women confronted Moyer in emails, Crew said. Crew said Moyer wrote them back, admitted the abuse and sent them a list of the names of 11 or 12 victims, with brief descriptions of how he abused them.

According to an article in The Japan Times, in March the school sent a letter to alumni stating it had recently learned Moyer had abused students. That drew sharp criticism from some alumni, who petitioned the school to hire an independent party to investigate whether the school covered up its knowledge of the reported abuse.

The school has hired a law firm to perform an independent investigation, according to Crew’s firm.

The letter sent to the American School demands that the results of the independent investigation be made public. The letter also asks the school to compensate the 10 women and an undetermined number of other alleged victims, but the letter doesn't list a dollar amount sought.

If a lawsuit is filed, Crew said it will most likely be in New Jersey, where the American School in Japan has a “sister corporation” called Friends of the American School in Japan.

Former students who say they were victimized have reached out to each other -- particularly after former student, Janet Simmons, began writing in 2009 about Moyer in a blog titled “Thank you for holding my hand.”

Crew said nine or 10 of the women his firm represents have all been supporting each other through an email network over the past few months or years.

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The Spanish masturbation expert Fran Sanchez Oria argues: "Masturbating for great sexual health… can increase your testosterone levels, specially when combined with ejaculation edging. I could probably make another post just on this, but in a nutshell if you masturbate until you are close to climax then stop, and repeat several times, your testosterone levels will build up significantly." Caught with his pants down, Fran Sanchez Oria (subsequently removed the page, but a printscreen is here and here.

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'He wasn't prepared for a second-class life': why injured rugby star went to Switzerland to die

The Guardian

A 23-year-old who played rugby for England as a teenager has committed suicide in a Swiss euthanasia clinic after having become paralysed from the chest down in a training accident. Police are investigating.

Nuneaton rugby club hooker Daniel James felt his body had become a "prison" and lived in "fear and loathing" of his daily life, his parents said last night, having accompanied him to Switzerland from their home in Sinton Green, near Worcester. He had attempted to kill himself several times since March 2007 when a scrum had collapsed on him and dislocated his neck vertebrae, trapping his spinal cord and rendering him immediately tetraplegic.

West Mercia Police have begun an investigation into his assisted suicide, which took place on September 12. Details were made public yesterday when police published a statement relating to an inquest in progress. Assisted suicide is illegal in the UK, and family or friends who help face up to 14 years in jail. Officers have questioned a man and a women in the case and are preparing to submit a report to the Crown Prosecution Service.

James' parents, Mark and Julie, said last night that their son had been "an intelligent young man of sound mind" and "not prepared to live what he felt was a second-class existence".

He is one of the youngest Britons to have travelled abroad for assisted suicide. Earlier this month, Dignitas, the centre for assisted dying in Zurich, said that 100 Britons have travelled to Switzerland to make use of its more liberal laws. It is thought James attended a clinic in Berne.

James was a talented player who seemed destined for a professional career. He played for England at under-16 level and went on to play for Loughborough University, where he was an engineering undergraduate. The training accident happened four days after he helped England Students beat a France side in Oxford.

In a training session for forwards, he was practising a scrum when the pack came crashing down. Under their weight, he dislocated bones in his neck and trapped the spinal cord.

In the following weeks he had several operations and spent eight months in rehabilitation, including a stay at Stoke Mandeville hospital, before returning home; he only ever regained a small amount of use in his fingers. Early last month he travelled to Switzerland. His funeral took place in the UK on October 1.

"His death was an extremely sad loss for his family, friends and all those that cared for him, but no doubt a welcome relief from the prison he felt his body had become and the day to day fear and loathing of his living existence," the James family solicitors said last night. "This is the last way that the family wanted Dan's life to end, but he was, as those who know him are aware, an intelligent, strong-willed, and some say determined young man."

Yesterday the Spinal Injuries Association expressed shock. "When someone has an injury like this, you think its the end of the world as life is going to change for ever," said Daniel Burden, head of public affairs. "But our mantra is that life need not end if you are paralysed. We know of people with similar or worse injuries than Dan who have lived fulfilling lives."

The case comes as Debbie Purdy, 45, who has primary progressive multiple sclerosis, awaits a high court judgement seeking clarification of the legal status of family and friends who accompany people who commit assisted suicide.

Her action is being supported by Dignity in Dying, which campaigns for a law change to allow terminally ill and mentally competent patients to choose assisted death in the UK. James, who was not terminally ill, would not have been eligible under any such alteration of the law.

Prior to his death, James's uncle, Mark Roebuck, who started The Dan James Trust which raised nearly £25,000 for spinal research, paid tribute to his nephew.

"On Monday March 12 2007 Dan was just like thousands of 23-year-olds, full of life, hope, excitement and dreams. Whatever he chose to do, he would have done it with the good humour and lovely nature that made him a lovable young man."

The message boards on Nuneaton rugby club's website carried tributes yesterday. "This is really sad and tragic news, and it makes all the silly arguments with the rugby and football club very trivial and unimportant," said Nutty Nun. "My thoughts, sympathy and prayers are with Dan's family. RIP Dan."

Forbidden by law

Although suicide is no longer a crime in England and Wales, it is still an offence under the Suicide Act 1961 to "aid, counsel or procure the suicide of another"; the penalty is up to 14 years' imprisonment, and there have been 12 prosecutions since 2005.

The only jurisdictions where assisted suicide is not illegal are Switzerland, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, and the state of Oregon in the US.

Although Swiss law does not specifically permit assisted suicide or provide any details about how it can be done legally, it does not prohibit it either. Several clinics have been established, providing facilities for terminally ill people to commit suicide, including Dignitas in Berne, the only clinic which offers its services to people not living in Switzerland. Since it opened in 1998 it has helped 868 people to end their lives, 100 of them from the UK.

Dignitas's motto is "to live with dignity - to die with dignity". It offers a service to the terminally ill and their families including accommodation, access to doctors and a dose of a drug causing a deep coma and painless death. However, anyone who accompanies a relative to Dignitas risks prosecution on their return for assisting suicide contrary to English law.

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Feminists have institutionalized violence against men through the legal systems of all Western nations. But women cannot win the violence competition. The more violent societies become, the more women need protection. And the more they need protection, the quicker they will abandon feminism. Rich men should invest their money in fostering violence in all societies. Then they will end up with their own harems. No feminists inside there.

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95 percent of the victims of work accidents are men. Because women are cowards, and just want to rule from behind.

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Controversial pick-up artist Roosh V celebrates Donald Trump’s victory: ‘If the President can say it then you can say it’

There are plenty of people who have mourned the election victory of Donald Trump.

Many of the protesters who have filled the streets of New York, Chicago and Los Angeles, fear his win will validate the sort of sexist and misogynist language and behaviour displayed by the New York tycoon during the campaign.

Yet a man who has made his name as a self-described expert on “picking up girls”, has been celebrating Mr Trump’s victory for those very reasons.

Daryush Valizadeh, who runs the website Roosh V and who published a book called Bang, which is says is a “textbook for…getting laid”, has been writing about how the promotion of a man caught bragging on video about sexually assaulting women, will benefit his readers.

“The celebrations have ended and we’ve all come to absorb the fact that Donald Trump is our next president, an outcome that many of us have aggressively worked for in the past several months,” he wrote.

“Now that we’ve gotten what we wanted, it’s time to describe exactly how a Trump presidency will improve our standing.”

Mr Valizadeh said the biggest affect will be the “death of political correctness”.

“We now have a s**tlord for President who has insulted ugly women as “fat pigs,” and whose private macho talk, which all masculine men have done, was relentlessly attacked by the press but not punished in the voter booth,” he said.

“This means that when you talk like Trump, the first thought your listener will have is, ‘He sounds like the President of the United States’.”

Mr Valizadeh made headlines earlier this year when he was accused of being “pro-rape” after publishing a “satirical thought experiment” apparently advocating legalising rape on private premises as a means of reducing rape.

He has also been condemed for his 15 self-published books, which include titles such as 30 Bangs, and YouTube videos giving advice to men on how to have sex with women.

Mr Valizadeh said the election result showed that “either Trump was elected because voters liked a person who makes those kinds of statements or they didn’t care enough that he made them”.

He added: “Whichever explanation you accept means that the will of the American people has stated that you can exercise your free speech, your opinions, and your desire to flirt with attractive women without having to obey a speech police force that evaluates everything you do based on how offensive it is to a kaleidoscope of races and loony identities.”

He said: “You can begin removing your politically correct filter.”

Protesters who have taken to the streets and parks of America’s biggest cities have been arguing the very same point, but from a different perspective. They say the election of Mr Trump means women and minorities are more vulnerable then ever.

In Los Angeles, Ru Dominguez, 52, an organiser with the labour union Unite Here who attended the LA march, said she and fellow union members were prepared to oppose his agenda at every turn. “We’re going to stick together,” she said. “Trump is a racist, he’s ignorant, and he’s not my president.”

In New York, a 25-year-old black man who asked to be identified only by his first name, James, told The Independent the election of Mr Trump had already led to a wave of incidents of racial and sexist abuse and harassment.

He said that because Mr Trump was elected after using racist language and being filmed bragging about abusing women, people felt emboldened. “I don’t think all Trump supporters are racist. I think a lot have lost their jobs and have fallen for his words,” he said.

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The world in 200 years will be populated by a few thousand male humans who live indefinitely, and a huge number of female looking robots. Women aren't needed, really, and anyway, women are troublemakers, more than anything else.

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Ali Al-Nimr’s Crucifixion Sentence in Saudi Arabia Sparks Outcry

NBC News

A young man facing beheading and crucifixion in Saudi Arabia was tortured and sentenced for political reasons, according to rights groups and a source close to his family calling for a halt to his execution.

Ali Mohammed al-Nimr was arrested in 2012 when he was 17 years old for participating in a protest. He was later sentenced to death for joining a criminal group and attacking police forces in proceedings which a United Nations body said "fell short of international standards."

The conviction was upheld this week by Saudi Arabia's highest court, and the execution could take place at any time. Al-Nimr's family has appealed for Saudi King Salman bin Abdulaziz to issue a pardon during the current Muslim holiday period of Eid.

"We hope that the king will not sign [the execution order]," al-Nimr's father Mohammed told Agence France Presse, warning that his son's grisly execution could also provoke a violent reaction in the minority Shiite community.

"We don't need that, we don't need even one drop of blood," he said.

The crucifixion sentence means that al-Nimr will most likely be beheaded first and his body later displayed on a cross in a public location, according to campaigners.

The fear that al-Nimr could be executed at any time has taken a steep toll on his father and other relatives, a source close to the family told NBC News.

They are "acting like they are okay, but I know the family and they are not," the source said, adding that Ali was defiantly "dreaming about the future" and was still hoping to study psychology one day.

A group of United Nations experts on torture and capital punishment urged Saudi Arabia to halt the execution, saying that al-Nimr was a child at the time of his offense and that the proceedings against him were flawed.

"Any judgment imposing the death penalty upon persons who were children at the time of the offence and their execution, are incompatible with Saudi Arabia's international obligations," they said in a statement, citing Saudi Arabia's ratification of the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Human-rights charities Reprieve and Amnesty International claim that Ali was tortured and forced to sign a confession after being arrested.

Maya Foa, director of Reprieve's death penalty team, called Ali's fate "an outrage" and said it was "deeply troubling" that the United States and other allies of Saudi Arabia were "staying silent" over the case.

"The international community must stand firm against this utterly unjustified sentence," she said in a statement.

Repeated approaches by NBC News to the Saudi authorities for comment have not received a response.

Ali was convicted in 2014 on range of charges including being part of a terrorist organization, carrying weapons and targeting security patrols with Molotov cocktails, the charity said. Additional charges included encouraging others to protest using his BlackBerry and explaining to others how to give first aid, they added.

Reprieve said Ali raised the torture claims at trial but that no investigation took place and the court used the confession to sentence him. Ali's final appeal was held in secret, according to Reprieve.

Ali's lawyer, Dr. Saqeb Mohamed tweeted on Tuesday that the defense team had not been able to visit his client or object to the sentence, adding that he was "surprised" the court had ratified the conviction.

He also called for Saudi authorities to investigate the case.

In the wake of the March 2011 Arab Spring, thousands took to the streets to protest decades of discrimination and religious and political repression by the country's Sunni dynasty, House of Saud, which has controlled the Arabian Peninsula since the 1930s. The uprising was met with a violent crackdown from the government.

The source close to the family admitted that al-Nimr had attended demonstrations and anti-government protests in his hometown of Qatif — but that the young man was not political.

The source suggested that political "revenge" was behind the charges laid against the young man — who is the nephew of Shia cleric and activist Sheikh Nimr Baqr al-Nimr, also separately facing execution.

Al-Nimr's cleric uncle was sentenced to death in a separate trial on terrorism charges and for "waging war on God" because of his speech during anti-government protests in Qatif, according to Amnesty International.

Amnesty called Sheikh al-Nimr's trial "deeply flawed" and said it was "part of a campaign by the authorities in Saudi Arabia to crush all dissent, including those defending the rights of the Kingdom's Shia Muslim community."

There have been 134 executions in Saudi Arabia this year, compared with 90 last year, they said.

The younger al-Nimr had no ambitions to follow his uncle's footsteps, the source close to the family said — describing a normal teen, who liked motorcycles, movies and photography.

Now the family hopes his life will be spared so they could spend more time with him.

"We are praying to God," they said. "It is all we can do. We are hopeful."

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As a man, instead of lamenting the Islamization of Europe, put yourself in the camp of the victors. Any man can become a Muslim by just uttering the Shahada. A matter of 5 minutes.

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